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Archive for February 2018

The Unstable Atrial Fibrillation Patient

THE CASE A 75 yo man is brought into your small rural ED after 3 hours of ischemic chest discomfort.  His background is significant for hypertension, a CVA 5 years ago for which he is on aspirin/dipyrimidole, and 2 coronary artery stents in 1995.  The ambulance officers found the patient to be in AF, with…

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Are You Still Feeling For A Pulse? Stop It!

I remember years ago when we used to manage cardiac arrests and everyone was asked to stop compressions while someone felt for a pulse. Do you remember that? “I think I feel one. I wonder if that’s mine? Can someone else feel please?” Meanwhile time with no CPR passed. Today with the push for cardiocerebral resuscitation…

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Pulseless Electrical Activity

Pulseless Electrical Activity(PEA) occurs in about 30% of cardiac arrest cases. Given that it’s not a shockable rhythm, it has a very poor prognosis, especially when associated with acute myocardial Infarction(MI)(1). More recently, the term pseudo-PEA, is used for those patients where we can’t find an output by feeling for a pulse, but there may in fact be…

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The Cervical Spine: The Iconoclasm Continues

In recent blogs I suggested that clinically significant C spine injuries can be excluded by CT scan in the intoxicated patient and Luke Lawton raised the suggestion that the hard collar may not be as efficacious as we were led to believe in our youth. One of the questions that the C spine blog attracted…

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How Important is a C-Spine Collar….really?

In preparation for EMCORE Hong Kong 2018, I took some time to sit down and revisit how and why we do one of the oldest rituals in trauma medicine – applying a rigid c-collar. I still remember as a junior doctor being taken through the rigorous method of application….measure up properly, hold the head steady,…

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Cervical spine clearance in the intoxicated patient

The most commonly used c spine clearance rules exclude or mandate imaging in the case of the “intoxicated” patient, and there is debate as to whether a normal CT C spine is adequate to clear the neck of the intoxicated patient in blunt trauma.(1,2) Many clinicians advocate either waiting for intoxicants to clear before clinically…

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