LATEST BLOGS

  • Are You Still Feeling For A Pulse? Stop It!

    Are You Still Feeling For A Pulse? Stop It!

    I remember years ago when we used to manage cardiac arrests and everyone was asked to stop compressions while someone felt for a pulse. Do you remember that? “I think I feel one. I wonder if that’s mine? Can someone else feel please?” Meanwhile time with no CPR passed. Today with the push for cardiocerebral resuscitation...

    Read More
  • Pulseless Electrical Activity

    Pulseless Electrical Activity

    Pulseless Electrical Activity(PEA) occurs in about 30% of cardiac arrest cases. Given that it’s not a shockable rhythm, it has a very poor prognosis, especially when associated with acute myocardial Infarction(MI)(1). More recently, the term pseudo-PEA, is used for those patients where we can’t find an output by feeling for a pulse, but there may in fact be...

  • The Cervical Spine: The Iconoclasm Continues

    The Cervical Spine: The Iconoclasm Continues

    In recent blogs I suggested that clinically significant C spine injuries can be excluded by CT scan in the intoxicated patient and Luke Lawton raised the suggestion that the hard collar may not be as efficacious as we were led to believe in our youth. One of the questions that the C spine blog attracted...

  • How Important is a C-Spine Collar….really?

    How Important is a C-Spine Collar….really?

    In preparation for EMCORE Hong Kong 2018, I took some time to sit down and revisit how and why we do one of the oldest rituals in trauma medicine – applying a rigid c-collar. I still remember as a junior doctor being taken through the rigorous method of application….measure up properly, hold the head steady,...

  • Cervical spine clearance in the intoxicated patient

    Cervical spine clearance in the intoxicated patient

    The most commonly used c spine clearance rules exclude or mandate imaging in the case of the “intoxicated” patient, and there is debate as to whether a normal CT C spine is adequate to clear the neck of the intoxicated patient in blunt trauma.(1,2) Many clinicians advocate either waiting for intoxicants to clear before clinically...

  • Postobstructive Diuresis

    Postobstructive Diuresis

    Postobstructive diuresis can occur following relief of urinary obstruction. It isn’t rare and can be potentially lethal. CASE A 65 year old male presents to the emergency department with a one day history of dysuria. He is diagnosed with a urine infection,  commenced on oral antibiotics and has an appointment made the next day for...

  • A patient with nausea, vomiting and lethargy

    A patient with nausea, vomiting and lethargy

    (Please note this is a free view of this week’s ‘own the ecg‘ blog. Enjoy). A 79 year old man presented to the emergency department with a 2 day history of nausea, vomiting, lethargy and left abdominal pain. He appeared pale, clammy and unwell. His initial observations revealed a pulse of 50/min, BP 170/87, sats of...

  • Cyanosis or Something Else?

    Cyanosis or Something Else?

    A 75 year old gentleman presented with acute on chronic abdominal pain. His triage noted that he was “centrally cyanosed, but comfortable” and that his daughter had reassured the concerned triage nurse that his skin was usually that colour and there was nothing to be concerned about. When I called the patient from the waiting...

  • Massive Propranolol Overdose

    Massive Propranolol Overdose

    Massive propranolol overdose is perhaps one of the most challenging overdoses to manage. In 2009 we posted a case we had. We have progressed in our management since then. CASE A 26 yo woman is brought to the ED by ambulance. She has been found by her mother in her bedroom in a confused state....

Email Updates
Join the Thousands of Members who get free updates on our Conferences PLUS Webcasts and Education Newsletters
We respect your privacy.

Facebook

Slide09

ECG of The Week

How long do we have, to pick up that an ECG is abnormal? Usually it’s about 20 seconds. I developed ‘The ECG in 20 Seconds Approach‘, a simple method, to help you read ECG’s.

Peter Kas's Message to You

Clinical Pearl

Head Thrust Test

In a patient with rotational vertigo and nystagmus, where we suspect, or wish to prove a peripheral lesion, this test is of assistance. It relies on the vestibulo-occular reflex, which is responsible for bringing the eyes back to the centre.

In unilateral nystagmus and rotational vertigo, the peripheral lesion is opposite to the direction of the fast nystagmus. When the head is turned towards the lesion, the eyes move with the head, for a brief moment and the vestibular-occular reflex then returns them to the centre. If this occurs it is a positive test indicating a peripheral cause.

Get Ready For Your Fellowship Exams and Pass

6 Month Written Fellowship Course

Pass the Fellowship Course with this 6 Month Course

Read More
x

6 Month Written Fellowship Course

THE DEFINITIVE COURSE TO HELP YOU PREPARE FOR YOUR FELLOWSHIP EXAMINATION.
VIDEOS, ARTICLES, SYNOPSES AND THOUSANDS OF MCQ'S, EMQ'S, SAQ'S,
PLUS
AN ON-LINE VIRTUAL COMMUNITY &
4 DAYS OF FACE TO FACE TEACHING.
If you want structure and a trusted way to pass the examination, then look at the course.

Why Watch Resus TV?

Resus TV is your weekly fix of informative video lectures

Read More
x

Why Watch Resus TV?

If you want to learn about a procedure or a new technique, or get a video synopsis of one of our lectures, then go to Resus TV.

PASS THE OSCE

Communication, Knowledge, Clinical Examination, Simulation and MORE!

Read More
x

PASS THE OSCE

This is the 2 days OSCE Course for the Emergency Medicine Fellowship. PASS THE OSCE, with total preparation. Seats are capped in number to allow better teaching.

Picture Gallery of the EMCORE Conference

Email Updates
Join the Thousands of Members who get free updates on our Conferences PLUS Webcasts and Education Newsletters
We respect your privacy.

Facebook

Email Updates
Get the latest updates on our Conferences PLUS Webcasts and Education Newsletters.
We respect your privacy.