LATEST BLOGS

  • Using Adrenaline the right way in Cardiac Resuscitation

    Using Adrenaline the right way in Cardiac Resuscitation

    ADRENALINE AND CARDIAC RESUSCITATION How much to use, when to use it and when not to use it. The resuscitation guidelines were born in the black-and-white television era, at the end of the 1950’s. The use of 1 mg of adrenaline which initially came from canine models, was introduced at this time and has been...

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  • Intraosseous Access Results In Decreased Survival In Cardiac Arrest

    Intraosseous Access Results In Decreased Survival In Cardiac Arrest

    A new study shows a decreased survival in out of hospital cardiac arrest(OHCA) when intraosseous(I/O) access is used instead if intravenous(IV) access as a means of delivering fluids and medications. I/O lines provide rapid access where IV is not available and are progressively being used as the first line of access, primarily because they are quick, easy, don’t interfere...

  • Paediatric Heart Conditions You MUST KNOW

    Paediatric Heart Conditions You MUST KNOW

    Congenital heart conditions present at birth, but can also present within the first month of life. We look at a simplified approach to the assessment and management of patients presenting with symptoms of congenital heart disease. In this video Dr Claire Wilkins, talks about these conditions and spits them into three categories: Patients presenting with SHOCK...

  • Myocarditis

    Myocarditis

    Myocarditis is simply an inflammation of the heart muscle, that can lead to myocardial cell damage, myocardial dysfunction and heart failure. A Recent Case A 15 yo male presents to the emergency department with sharp central chest pain that is worst on inspiration. The pain has woken him from sleep. There is no radiation although...

  • Should We Shock Patients in Asystole?

    Should We Shock Patients in Asystole?

    Should cardiac arrest patients in asystole be shocked? Is there any advantage to this? What do we know about asystole in cardiac arrest? Patients in asystole are known to have a very poor prognosis, with 0% to 2% surviving to hospital discharge. There is a slightly better prognosis if the rhythm converts spontaneously to a shockable rhythm...

  • Fever in the ED

    Fever in the ED

    Fever In The Emergency Department We like to see things as binary in the ED, troponins, d-dimers, CTPA they all give yes no answers. We often treat fever in a similar way, fever = infection just like our mothers taught us. But are we any better than a hand on the forehead, can we use temperature...

  • Syncope Rules

    Syncope Rules

    Patients presenting with syncope to the Emergency Department can pose a significant diagnostic challenge. The two main reasons for this are: Syncope is a symptom, not a diagnosis. We need to search for the underlying cause. Adverse events can occur, when none are obvious or predictable during our Emergency Department evaluation. We know that the rate...

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PRIMARY EXAM COURSE

PRIMARY EXAM COURSE

See Us LIVE at our Amazing Emergency Medicine Conferences HONG KONG | MELBOURNE | FIJI | SANTORINI and MORE!

This is where I'll be speaking next.......

EMCORE FIJI
2-4 October

EMCORE Santorini
25-27 October

ECG of The Week

How long do we have, to pick up that an ECG is abnormal? Usually it’s about 20 seconds. I developed ‘The ECG in 20 Seconds Approach‘, a simple method, to help you read ECG’s.

Peter Kas's Message to You

Clinical Pearl

Head Thrust Test

In a patient with rotational vertigo and nystagmus, where we suspect, or wish to prove a peripheral lesion, this test is of assistance. It relies on the vestibulo-occular reflex, which is responsible for bringing the eyes back to the centre.

In unilateral nystagmus and rotational vertigo, the peripheral lesion is opposite to the direction of the fast nystagmus. When the head is turned towards the lesion, the eyes move with the head, for a brief moment and the vestibular-occular reflex then returns them to the centre. If this occurs it is a positive test indicating a peripheral cause.

Get Ready For Your Fellowship Exams and Pass

6 Month Written Fellowship Course

Pass the Fellowship Course with this 6 Month Course

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6 Month Written Fellowship Course

THE DEFINITIVE COURSE TO HELP YOU PREPARE FOR YOUR FELLOWSHIP EXAMINATION.
VIDEOS, ARTICLES, SYNOPSES AND THOUSANDS OF MCQ'S, EMQ'S, SAQ'S,
PLUS
AN ON-LINE VIRTUAL COMMUNITY &
4 DAYS OF FACE TO FACE TEACHING.
If you want structure and a trusted way to pass the examination, then look at the course.

Why Watch Resus TV?

Resus TV is your weekly fix of informative video lectures

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Why Watch Resus TV?

If you want to learn about a procedure or a new technique, or get a video synopsis of one of our lectures, then go to Resus TV.

PASS THE OSCE

Communication, Knowledge, Clinical Examination, Simulation and MORE!

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PASS THE OSCE

This is the 2 days OSCE Course for the Emergency Medicine Fellowship. PASS THE OSCE, with total preparation. Seats are capped in number to allow better teaching.

Picture Gallery of the EMCORE Conference

Email Updates
Join the Thousands of Members who get free updates on our Conferences PLUS Webcasts and Education Newsletters
We respect your privacy.

PRIMARY EXAM COURSE

PRIMARY EXAM COURSE

See Us LIVE at our Amazing Emergency Medicine Conferences HONG KONG | MELBOURNE | FIJI | SANTORINI and MORE!

Email Updates
Get the latest updates on our Conferences PLUS Webcasts and Education Newsletters.
We respect your privacy.