LATEST BLOGS

  • Hyponatremia

    Hyponatremia

    Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte abnormality. It can be acute or chronic. It can occur in isolation or as part of other disease processes.  Diagnosing its cause can be challenging in the Emergency Department and there may be some confusion over how to initially manage these patients. Let’s clear up that confusion, with a simple...

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  • Important Studies in Emergency Medicine

    Important Studies in Emergency Medicine

    Below are some important studies in Emergency Medicine. There certainly are more, however these are the most recent and relevant. More will be added to this page regularly. TRAUMA Sherren PB et al. Algorithm for the resuscitation of traumatic cardiac arrest patients in a physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical service. Critical Care 201317(Suppl 2):P281 The authors here looked...

  • Status Epilepticus

    Status Epilepticus

    Convulsive Status Epilepticus accounts for up to 75% of all status epilepticus(1). We recognise it in patients where they have a depressed conscious state accompanied by tonic clonic movements of the extremities. The length of status epilepticus is important in terms of patient survival. About 5% of adults and up to 25% of children with epilepsy...

  • Carotid Artery Dissection

    Carotid Artery Dissection

    Patients can present to us with a sudden severe headache, also known as a thunderclap headache. Although there are several potential causes of sudden headache(shown below), the main aetiology we try to exclude in the emergency department, is aneurysmal rupture. When we do rule this out, we still need to consider the other possible causes...

  • Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    You’ve just seen a patient with sudden onset of headache. They have presented within 6 hours and your super-sliced scanner spits out a normal CT brain. Are you done? You apply shared decision making with your patient and decide against a lumbar puncture. Are you done? Beware the mimics; amongst them cerebral venous thrombosis and...

  • Cardiogenic Shock: Which Vasopressor to use

    Cardiogenic Shock: Which Vasopressor to use

    In the patient who presents with cariogenic shock, the cath lab and a stent or a CABG is probably the treatment of choice, however we don’t always have those luxuries. What inotrope(s) do we use in cariogenic shock? How do we approach those patients for the best outcome? Here is a recent case. It is...

  • Asymptomatic Cervical Fractures in The Elderly

    Asymptomatic Cervical Fractures in The Elderly

    A new study is about to be published which questions the use of current cervical spine clearance criteria in the elderly(1). It goes further, recommending  “liberal c-spine imaging for older trauma patients with significant mechanism of trauma”. Here is a typical case: 74 year old patient from home, has had a mechanical fall from a...

  • BRUE and ALTE

    BRUE and ALTE

    A BRUE is a Brief Resolved Unexplained Event and has somehow replaced the old term of ALTE, allowing us to identify a lower risk group amongst children. It is a ‘consensus’ decision and although appears helpful may not be so. CASE: A 3 month old is brought in by his parents. He had an episode where...

  • Syncope

    Syncope

    Syncope is one of those conditions you either love or hate. I certainly have at least five presentations of patients with syncope per shift. Having an approach to those patients certainly helps minimise missing the big stuff. Remember that syncope is a symptom and we need to find the diagnosis. The detective work is about...

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EMCORE FIJI 26-28 September 2017
Fellowship Course

ECG of The Week

How long do we have, to pick up that an ECG is abnormal? Usually it’s about 20 seconds. I developed ‘The ECG in 20 Seconds Approach‘, a simple method, to help you read ECG’s.

Clinical Pearl

Head Thrust Test

In a patient with rotational vertigo and nystagmus, where we suspect, or wish to prove a peripheral lesion, this test is of assistance. It relies on the vestibulo-occular reflex, which is responsible for bringing the eyes back to the centre.

In unilateral nystagmus and rotational vertigo, the peripheral lesion is opposite to the direction of the fast nystagmus. When the head is turned towards the lesion, the eyes move with the head, for a brief moment and the vestibular-occular reflex then returns them to the centre. If this occurs it is a positive test indicating a peripheral cause.

Get Ready For Your Fellowship Exams and Pass

6 Month Written Fellowship Course

Pass the Fellowship Course with this 6 Month Course

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6 Month Written Fellowship Course

THE DEFINITIVE COURSE TO HELP YOU PREPARE FOR YOUR FELLOWSHIP EXAMINATION.
VIDEOS, ARTICLES, SYNOPSES AND THOUSANDS OF MCQ'S, EMQ'S, SAQ'S,
PLUS
AN ON-LINE VIRTUAL COMMUNITY &
4 DAYS OF FACE TO FACE TEACHING.
If you want structure and a trusted way to pass the examination, then look at the course.

Why Watch Resus TV?

Resus TV is your weekly fix of informative video lectures

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Why Watch Resus TV?

If you want to learn about a procedure or a new technique, or get a video synopsis of one of our lectures, then go to Resus TV.

PASS THE OSCE

Communication, Knowledge, Clinical Examination, Simulation and MORE!

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PASS THE OSCE

This is the 2 days OSCE Course for the Emergency Medicine Fellowship. PASS THE OSCE, with total preparation. Seats are capped in number to allow better teaching.

Picture Gallery of the EMCORE Conference

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