LATEST BLOGS

  • Wellen’s Syndrome

    Wellen’s Syndrome

    Wellen’s Syndrome is one of those syndromes that all emergency physicians know about. It’s probably also one of those syndromes that the emergency community introduced to clinicians everywhere. It was first described as an inverted U wave as early as 1980 and then introduced by Wellen in 1982 as Wellen’s syndrome, the name by which...

    Read More
  • Spodick’s Sign and Pericarditis

    Spodick’s Sign and Pericarditis

    Spodick’s Sign appears in Stage I of Pericarditis and is a downsloping of the TP line ie., the baseline. It is said to be present in some 80% of cases of acute pericarditis and is best visualised in lead II and the lateral precordial leads(1).       The ECG findings of pericarditis are important...

  • Which Patients with Pulmonary Embolism should get Thrombolysis?

    Which Patients with Pulmonary Embolism should get Thrombolysis?

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism(PE) is an almost common occurrence in the emergency department. The question of which patients to thrombolyse can be a difficult one to answer. Certainly there is consensus over patients with massive PEs needing thrombolysis. The same cannot be said for those patients with a submissive PE, because our greatest fear is...

  • Lactation Ketoacidosis

    Lactation Ketoacidosis

    I go on about how important it is to be able to interpret blood gases, with our junior doctors and Fellowship Candidates. It can really change your diagnostic capabilities in the emergency department. Here is an interesting case, where gases solve the problem. A 30 yo woman is transferred to your emergency department. She has...

  • Fluid Resuscitation in Pancreatitis

    Fluid Resuscitation in Pancreatitis

    It is the festive season and with it, comes the patient that has more than their usual few drinks. They present to the emergency department soon after, with abdominal pain and nausea and when their lipase comes back; a diagnosis of pancreatitis. This disease carries an overall risk of mortality of 2%, but it may...

  • Ciguatera Toxicity and Allodynia

    Ciguatera Toxicity and Allodynia

    The Case: A 60 yo male presents to the emergency department with Ciguatera Toxicity. He is frightened by the symptoms he has developed. This morning he noticed some paraesthesia around the mouth. He also noticed that when he picked up a cold bottle of water it ‘burnt’ his hand. Also when he splashed cold water...

  • Flexor Tendon Sheath Infections of The Hand

    Flexor Tendon Sheath Infections of The Hand

    Infection of the flexor tendon sheaths of the hand, represents a potential surgical emergency, due to these being closed compartments and swelling can result in necrosis. The same does not tend to occur in extensor tendons as they are open compartments. Infections to the flexor tendon sheath usually occur following a penetrating injury to the...

  • Pulmonary Embolism in Patients With Syncope

    Pulmonary Embolism in Patients With Syncope

    HOT OFF THE PRESS Prandoni P et al. Prevalence of Pulmonary Embolism among Patients Hospitalised for Syncope. NEJM 375:16 Oct 20 2016. This is a big study in the NEJM, that a lot of people will pay attention to. The finding in a nutshell, was that Pulmonary Embolism(PE) occurs in 1 in 6 patients hospitalised...

Free Email Updates
Get the latest content first.
We respect your privacy.

Facebook

screen-shot-2016-11-13-at-1-54-14-pm
screen-shot-2016-10-11-at-3-40-58-pm

ECG of The Week

How long do we have, to pick up that an ECG is abnormal? Usually it’s about 20 seconds. I developed ‘The ECG in 20 Seconds Approach‘, a simple method, to help you read ECG’s.

Clinical Pearl

Head Thrust Test

In a patient with rotational vertigo and nystagmus, where we suspect, or wish to prove a peripheral lesion, this test is of assistance. It relies on the vestibulo-occular reflex, which is responsible for bringing the eyes back to the centre.

In unilateral nystagmus and rotational vertigo, the peripheral lesion is opposite to the direction of the fast nystagmus. When the head is turned towards the lesion, the eyes move with the head, for a brief moment and the vestibular-occular reflex then returns them to the centre. If this occurs it is a positive test indicating a peripheral cause.

Get Ready For Your Fellowship Exams and Pass

6 Month Written Fellowship Course

Pass the Fellowship Course with this 6 Month Course

Read More
x

6 Month Written Fellowship Course

THE DEFINITIVE COURSE TO HELP YOU PREPARE FOR YOUR FELLOWSHIP EXAMINATION.
VIDEOS, ARTICLES, SYNOPSES AND THOUSANDS OF MCQ'S, EMQ'S, SAQ'S,
PLUS
AN ON-LINE VIRTUAL COMMUNITY &
4 DAYS OF FACE TO FACE TEACHING.
If you want structure and a trusted way to pass the examination, then look at the course.

Why Watch Resus TV?

Resus TV is your weekly fix of informative video lectures

Read More
x

Why Watch Resus TV?

If you want to learn about a procedure or a new technique, or get a video synopsis of one of our lectures, then go to Resus TV.

PASS THE OSCE

Communication, Knowledge, Clinical Examination, Simulation and MORE!

Read More
x

PASS THE OSCE

This is the 2 days OSCE Course for the Emergency Medicine Fellowship. PASS THE OSCE, with total preparation. Seats are capped in number to allow better teaching.

Picture Gallery of the EMCORE Conference

Free Email Updates
Get the latest content first.
We respect your privacy.

Facebook

Free Email Updates
Get the latest content first.
We respect your privacy.